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    Why Yearbook?

    Because yearbook…

    …And other journalism students do better

    Research from 1987 was recently replicated with the same results, reconfirming that students who work on high school publications such as yearbook get better grades in high school, score better on the ACT, earn better grades as college freshmen and are more involved in activities offering leadership and service opportunities.

    …IS THE EPITOME OF EDUCATIONAL EXCELLENCE

    With all the lessons learned by yearbookers, there’s a clear correlation with even the most rigorous educational expectations. The process has offered “authentic assessment” since day one and the book itself is a “performance portfolio.” It’s easy to see how yearbook aligns with the Common Core’s emphasis on research, reflection and revision, and the four C’s touted by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills (critical thinking, collaboration, communication and creativity) are naturally a part of the yearbook process. Talk about cross-disciplinary learning!

    …TEACHES LIFE-LONG LESSONS

    In addition to learning about photography and design, yearbook students become better communicators and stronger leaders. They meet real-world deadlines, deal with significant budgets and produce the only permanent record of the school year. Former editors are quick to credit yearbook with teaching them life lessons that were beneficial as they transitioned to college and continue to be valuable in their professional lives.

    Students know some advantages of being on the yearbook staff.
    Staffers are aware of what’s going on at school. They have access to photo and computer equipment. Yearbookers learn real-life skills and get to leave their mark by creating a book that lasts forever.
    But, there are even more great answers to the question

    Why Yearbook?

     

    Research commissioned by the Newspaper Association of America Foundation suggests that if student achievement is the goal, then schools would be well-served if they offer students the opportunity to work on high school newspapers and yearbooks.

    To view the complete article, click on the button below.

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    Also, read how school spirit can be tied to higher graduation rates.

    Additional Resources

    50 Yearbook Survey Questions for Students

    We have provided some survey questions to ask high school students to inspire yearbook coverage ideas. Use these 50 top questions for surveys or as a jumping off point for yearbook interviews.

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    Learn More and Be Inspired

    Learning about yearbook journalism never quite ends. There is always room to grow, and widespread yearbook events could be the answer for you and your staff. With so many summer workshops and various conventions throughout the year, like JEA, NSPA and CSPA, the opportunity to learn, share ideas and improve …

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    Conquering Group Photo Day

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